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Another address, signed by eight hundred and thirty-three residents, was presented to Governor Bligh, expressive of their confidence in his administration in the year 1808. The old denominational school system came to an end by the erection and opening: of the present Public School in 1870. However, it is known that Governor King gave him forty gallons of spirits as a reward for some service rendered on May 27th, 1806. It is evident that Andrew Thompson did traffic pretty largely in spirits, for he was fined £100 in 1807 for so doing. Again, we find in 1800 a reference to the profits made on the sale of spirits by Andrew Thompson, the Governor's bailiff. vii., page 225.) He acquired a number of properties by purchase, including property in Baker Street and in Bridge Street, Windsor. Governor Bligh, and his son-in-law, Captain Putland, had farms near Pitt Town, where Bligh's oaks may still be seen. From this it appears that he obtained four hundred gallons of spirits which he retailed at a profit of twelve hundred pounds. His town residence in Sydney was in Macquarie Place. At another meeting to consider local grievances, John Bowman, Matthew Gibbons, and William Cummins were also present. Evans, William Baker, Thomas Arndell, Samuel Solomon and Andrew Thompson. The main streets in Windsor proper were laid out and named. All these and other appointments and improvements were made in the years 1810-12, and from this date Windsor grew in importance and wealth as the chief inland town in the colony. The Evening News, in August and October, 1897, had a series of articles on Margaret Catchpole. This wharf was on the same spot, close to the present bridge, as that still used. Gentlemen, Graziers and the public generally are respectfully informed that the Windsor Fair will be held at the Market Place, Windsor, on Tuesday, 10th June, 1834, being the second Tuesday in the month of June, and that no charge is made by way of fee or toll for stock or articles offered for sale at the said Fair. About 1836, Glebe Street, afterwards known as Tebbutt Street, was surveyed off the Church Green and the allotments facing the Green sold. His death was specially notified to the Secretary of State, by Governor Macquarie, on 27th October, 1810. "In retracing the last twenty years of the life of this exemplary and much lamented character, it will not be held uncharitable to glance at the lapse from rectitude, which in an early and inexperienced period of youth destined him to these shores, since it will stamp a more honourable tribute to his memory to have it recorded, that from his first arrival in this country he uniformly conducted himself with that strict regard to integrity and morality as to obtain and enjoy the countenance and protection of several succeeding Governors. Matthew's church-yard reads as follows:— SACRED Justice of the Peace and Chief Magistrate of the District of the Hawkesbury, a Native of Scotland, who at the age of 17 Years was sent to this Country where from the time of his arrival he distinguished himself by the most persevering industry and diligent attention to the commands of his Superiors. As late as the year 1858 Windsor was considered the fourth town in the colony. William Walker in that year gave the following list of populations: Parramatta 15,758, Maitland 15,290, Bathurst 12,005, Windsor 8,431, Goulburn 7,028. In the year 1820, a party of explorers left Windsor to examine the Hunter River district. The party returned via the present site of Maitland, and several of the old Windsor residents became pioneers of that northern district. Fifteen hundred pounds was paid for it to Thompson's trustees in 1812. John Howe, Clerk of Market, pro tem." In 1831, the following were the Windsor contractors for the supply of stores, firewood, and cartage for the local Government survey parties:—Jas. The Roman Catholic Church got their grant from this in 1837. In his will he named as executors, John Howe, Simeon Lord (he was the father of the late George W. Active, intelligent, and industrious of manners, mild and conciliatory, with a heart generous and humane, Mr. By these means he raised himself to a state of respectability and affluence which enabled him to indulge the generosity of his nature In assisting his fellow Creatures in distress more particularly in the Calamitous Floods of the river Hawkesbury in the Years 18, and [when] at the immediate risque of his life and perminant injury of his health he exerted himself each time during three successive Days and Nights in saving the lives and Properties of numbers who but for him must have Perished. Thompsons good Conduct, Governor Macquarie appointed him Justice of the Peace. Amongst the leading laymen in the church in the past years, we find:—Mr. The Articles have been the subject of considerable correspondence, both in the local paper and direct to the author. Henry Selkirk, of the Lands Department, and for several years a kindly neighbour in Killara. The following year many more families were settled, and as the natives were troublesome, some troops from the N. It is of interest to note that Lieutenant Grose was the son of Captain Grose, concerning whose peregrinations through Scotland the poet Burns wrote: A chiel's amang you takin' notes, And faith he'll print it. The Grants from the year 1800 to 1804 were as follows—Thomas Hobby, William Bates, Lydia Austen, Charles Marsden (900 acres), William Ezzy (130 acres), Henry Cox, and Andrew Thompson. The bat of missing books is given, which includes such standard works as Milton, Burns, Sterne, Thomson, Hervey and others. The foundation stones of this church were laid by Rev. By this means valuable revisions and additions have been made. "I have read the articles on the 'Early Days of Windsor', by the Rev. "As a native of Windsor, with a clear recollection of the past seventy-five years, I may say that the author has spared no pains to make his statements accurate and reliable. The earliest Hawkesbury Crown grants included those to Samuel Wilcox, John Brindley, William Bond, John Ruffler, Alexander Wilson, and Whaelen. Thomas Westmore and William Anderson, James Ruse, Ann Blady and Joseph Smallwood, in 1797. These may be easily located on the map of the Parish of St. The grants for the same period made near Pitt Town were:—Messrs. A Government order, dated 8th April, 1804, ordered that all boats trading on the Hawkesbury River should be numbered and registered by Andrew Thompson, head constable, otherwise they would be confiscated. The same year efforts were made to grow rice, but with little success. During the years 1804-5 Governor King proclaimed the following Commons in the district:— Ham Common. Later Trustees for Ham Common were: Abraham Cornwell, Robert Fitzgerald, George Bowman. A school was also established at an early period, situated near South Creek, just behind the Court House. The residents took an interest in the affairs of the colony in those early days. He was presented with a large puree of sovereigns, subscribed by all denominations. This he carried on at Scotland Island, near Newport, at the mouth of the Hawkesbury. Some good cedar trees were growing in the district, and settlers were prohibited from cutting them, as the Government claimed them all. Thomas Arndell and Charles Grimes, Deputy Surveyor, were appointed resident magistrates in 1802. Grimes left the district in 1803, and was succeeded by Surveyor G. Trustees: William Cox, John Bowman, Andrew Thompson, Edward Tutterill, William Minchin. Trustees: Andrew Thompson, Thomas Biggars, Thomas Tyler. As will be seen on reference to the articles on "Schools and Churches" elsewhere, divine service was held at the Hawkesbury by Rev. A covered waggon began to ply three times a week between Windsor and Sydney, starting on 9th February, 1805. An address was presented by them to the Senior Chaplain, Rev. Marsden, on the occasion of his visiting England in 1807. A big flood in Maitland in 1875 called forth the sympathy of the Windsor residents, who subscribed one hundred and ten pounds for the relief fund. It is said that he also had an illicit distillery here. Biggars got a similar reward at the same time, spirits in those days, as was well-known, being a medium of exchange.

In pursuance of this plan, and with a view to the prosperity of the country, he has already fixed upon the most eligible situations within the several districts bordering on these rivers, and marked out on the several Commons where the townships are to be established, and each settler will be assigned an allotment of ground for a dwelling house, offices, garden, corn-yard, and stock yard, proportioned to the extent of the farm he holds within the influence of the floods; but it is to be clearly understood that the allotments so given, being intended as places of security for the produce of the lands on the banks of the Hawkesbury and Nepean, cannot be sold or alienated in any manner whatever, but with the farms to which they are from the commencement to be annexed, and they are to be always considered as forming an inseparable part of the said farms. Thomas Bayliss was tried for house-breaking at Mulgrave, and was executed on 31st October, 1829. Governor Macquarie reports that on 30th April, 1810, Andrew Thompson was received at the Governor's table, in Sydney, along with Simeon Lord, an opulent Sydney merchant, and Dr. Baker afterwards kept an hotel in Baker Street, known as the Royal Oak. On account of distress caused by floods the Governor curtailed the sale of rum during the year 1798. He next appears on the scene as a brewer, receiving permission on 11th May, 1806, to sell at a shilling a gallon, and small beer sixpence. The old Government House was also built about this time as a residence for Lieutenant Edward Abbott, commander of the troops for the N. About the year 1800 there appeared on the Hawkesbury a settler named Andrew Thompson, who played a leading part in the development of the district up to the time of his death in 1810. His brewery was situated on the bank of the South Creek. Hughes (who was the schoolmaster at Richmond, and formerly at Windsor), R. His history and numerous occupations are fully dealt with in another place. The time occupied on the journey was sixteen hours, and William Roberts was the enterprising coachman. In connection with the brewery he also kept a public-house. In the year 1826 the members of the Windsor chapel raised the large sum of three hundred and fifty-six pounds, nineteen shillings for missionary work. In the year 1802 the Gist bridge (a floating structure) was built over the South Creek. Trustees: Mathew Lock, Edward Robinson, Henry Baldwin. Ship and boat building was parried on at tins time along the banks of the Hawkesbury, to which reference is made in Chapter II. In 1880 two of these were replaced by Benjamin Richards and David Cobcroft. Dean Hallinan left Windsor, after a ministry of twenty-two years in the Roman Catholic Church. Another industry he started was the manufacture of salt. The leading Wesleyan laymen in these early days were:—Messrs.

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